https://fareastgizmos.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/mit-diaper-rfid_pankhuri_sen.jpg

Low-cost “smart” diaper embedded with a moisture sensor can notify caregiver when it’s wet

MIT researchers have developed a “smart” diaper embedded with a moisture sensor that can alert a caregiver when a diaper is wet. When the sensor detects dampness in the diaper, it sends a signal to a nearby receiver, which in turn can send a notification to a smartphone or computer. Pankhuri Sen, a research assistant in MIT’s AutoID Laboratory, envisions that the sensor could also be integrated into adult diapers, for patients who might be unaware or too embarrassed to report themselves that a change is needed.

The sensor consists of a passive radio frequency identification (RFID) tag, that is placed below a layer of super absorbent polymer, a type of hydrogel that is typically used in diapers to soak up moisture. When the hydrogel is wet, the material expands and becomes slightly conductive — enough to trigger the RFID tag to send a radio signal to an RFID reader up to 1 meter away.  The researchers say the design is the first demonstration of hydrogel as a functional antenna element for moisture sensing in diapers using RFID. They estimate that the sensor costs less than 2 cents to manufacture, making it a low-cost, disposable alternative to other smart diaper technology.

READ  Toshiba Develops 3D Metal Printer with Over Ten Times Faster Fabrication Speed than Current Method

Over time, smart diapers may help record and identify certain health problems, such as signs of constipation or incontinence. The new sensor may be especially useful for nurses working in neonatal units and caring for multiple babies at a time. RFID tags are low-cost and disposable, and can be printed in rolls of individual stickers, similar to barcode tags.

READ  Transcend High-Performance USB Flash Drive JetFlash 910 can Transfer a 4GB File in Less than 15 Seconds